Standards

Very simply, I prepare the cars I sell properly and then give an honest description to any perspective buyer. I don’t need to lie through my teeth or try and sweet-talk you into buying something you don’t want. To be fair, I find selling my cars easy enough as it is: its buying decent cars in the first place thats the difficult bit. Its also worth pointing out that, unlike one or two of the other MX5 specialists out there, I don't deal in accident damaged cars or insurance write-offs and neither do I buy rusty MOT failures and then try and bodge them to get another year or two out of them. My cars are carefully hand-picked. I'm lucky in that I have driven literally thousands of different MX5s over the years and I have a good idea for how a well sorted car is supposed to feel and sound, how its supposed to handle and how strong the performance is supposed to be. A bad car stands out fairly quickly. I'm almost embarrassed to say (because it shows what an absolute anorak I am!) that I can spot an MX5 with rusty inner sills simply by the way it drives...

I’m not trying to kid you that every car is perfect (especially on a car that is perhaps 18 years old) but if there is something that needs attending to (for example, a stereo system that has seen better days) then I’ll tell you so there are no surprises. I would much prefer to point out any faults at the outset than have you find them later on and be disappointed. That said, I try and prepare my cars so that the new owner should not have any immediate painful bills and can just get on and have some fun. I give a detailed description and provide a decent set of photographs as I want to present each car in a favourable light. However, I’m very conscious that this means that the car can appear - to be blunt – better than it actually is. Cars nearly always look better in photographs than they do in the flesh – you just can’t see the tiny scratches, odd stonechips and other signs of use on a photo.

So realistically, what can you expect?
Let s make this clear - buying a 20 year old Mazda is not the same as buying a brand new Audi from a main dealer – very simply allowances need to be made for age, use and mileage. Let’s face it, a 20 year old car priced at £3000 isn’t really going to be in mint condition is it? Most cars of this age will have had some paintwork carried out for example, not all will have full service histories and they will have had various bits and bobs replaced or modified over the years. Sometimes, something will just not work in the same way that it did when the car left the factory perhaps 20 years ago. For example, a plastic rear window may not be quite as clear as it once was, reception on a stereo system may not be as strong as on a modern new unit or an interior light switch may not work with the same accuracy as it once did. I’m going to make another bold statement here so brace yourself: any older car will require a constant program of maintenance, along with the occasional repair. I hope this doesn’t sound too miserable! I prefer to think of it as being realistic and honest. And I still believe that my cars are prepared to a higher standard than most out there.

Accordingly, each of my cars go through our own check list and report (I’m happy to email this to you beforehand) and then each is fully serviced, HPI checked, MOT’d, valeted and prepared ready to be enjoyed. If you are thinking about travelling a fair distance to view or buy, I’m happy to walk round the car, phone-in-hand and talk you through the car, panel by panel, giving you a thorough description so you know what to expect when you get here. I can also email photographs if required.

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